Island, Book Two: Survival – by Gordon Korman (2007)

Island book 2

The second book in the “Island” trilogy picks up right where the first one ended. The six teens are on an island somewhere in the Pacific Ocean. At this point, they realize that if they want to survive, they have to put aside their petty disagreements. They start working together to find food, water, and shelter.

It isn’t long, however, before they discover that they are not alone on the island. And the other people are definitely not there to help them. To make matters worse, one of the six becomes seriously ill. Their only hope is to find some way off the island. Desperation binds the six together, and a plan is made to get at least one of them back to civilization.

I loved the growing friendship between the six teens in this book. Instead of constantly thinking of themselves, they began to think of others first, and what they could do to help and protect each other. Compassion and growing friendship made this a great read.

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Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer – by John Grisham (2010)

Theodore Boone - Kid Lawyer

Theodore is the only child of a husband-wife lawyer team in the small town of Strattenburg. His father handles real estate deals, his mother divorce cases. He hangs out at his parents’ office after school, and is well-known at the local courthouse. Conversations at dinner often center around the law. At 13 years of age, Theo already has a better grasp of legal matters and defense strategies than most adults. His dream is to become a skilled lawyer like his parents.

Theo’s fascination with everything legal earns him the nickname “kid lawyer”. He answers classmates’ questions about the law. He also goes to the courthouse with his friend April to offer moral support. When the trial of accused killer Pete Duffy starts, the government class is allowed to see the opening arguments. Theo is immediately fascinated with the case, and gets personally involved.

Grisham’s first novel for pre-adults is a fun read. I enjoyed the unusual-ness of the Boone family. His close friendship with April, whose life is rather messed up, added to the story. Lastly, Theo’s crazy Uncle Ike was terrific. This story can be enjoyed by readers spanning middle-school, high school, and adult ages. A copy of this book can be found in the teen or young adult section of your local library.